Staff Name Badges – Way to Promote Your Company

Having staff name badges is a form of free advertising for your business especially if you are the new kid in the business block. Whenever people come into contact with your staff, they are able to instantly recognize from their staff badges your company logo; this instantly registers in their minds information about your business.

The second reason for having staff name badges is for the purpose of identification. A staff badge is able to show a limited amount of information about a person like their name, their position or job role in a company and maybe even their business or company identification number. This helps staff within an organization to know each other well especially in the case of a new staff member who has to be introduced to many people all at once. A staff badge can help a lot the staff member in getting well acquainted with his or her new work colleagues without the awkward phrase of “Could you please remind me your name again?” Staff badges can also help customers to identify whom to talk to or seek help from in a business premises. Like for instance in a hospital, a staff badge can help a patient know who is a nurse, who is a doctor, or who is just a hospital administrator like for example an accountant.

The third reason why name badges are important is because they help promote a sense of belonging amongst the company staff. Many people take pride in bragging to their friends and family about working for such and such company. For these people, working for their dream organizations and been able to show a staff badge with their names and job title on them is something they take pride in. Staff name badges basically make staff feel appreciated and recognized by the company or business owner. And as we all know, somebody who feels appreciated is often happier and a better worker.

The last reason why staff name badges are important is for safety and security measures. By workers having a staff badge that can help security personnel easily identify them, outsiders who pose a security risk to the business can be controlled from entering a premises. Those who enter the business from outside can in turn be given a visitor’s badge which can help staff identify that they are visitors indeed and not fellow workers. Staff name badges are very important and because of that every business or institution should have them.

Tips for Project Risk Management Success

The benefits of risk management are vast, yet for many projects this is an area still commonly overlooked. By applying simple and consistent risk management techniques we can easily minimise the impact of potential threats as well as leverage potential opportunities. This not only ensures meeting the agreed scope, cost and time but also improves the overall health and efficiency of the project operation, team members and wider stakeholders. This article comes back to the basics on the key rules of managing risk, to ensure your projects are consistently delivered with full success.

Tip #1 – Implement a solid identification process
Sounds simple right. However there are still many projects today that are managed with absolutely no formal risk identification incorporated. Then there are others that think they are using risk management appropriately but are not applying the correct techniques to identify risks. The identification process will depend on the project, the organisation and the company culture involved. So it is best to consider those areas when determining the most effective approach. This could be as simple as educating the team on what a risk actually is and asking them periodically to review the landscape for new risks. Or for large projects the PMO can be leveraged to ensure risk identification is included in the drumbeat.

Tip #2 – Be positive
Risk management includes identifying and managing both negative risks and positive ones, yet most projects typically seem to focus only on the negative ones. Ensure to add clear reminders and pointers within your risk management process to consider positive risks. A deliverable being delivered well before its due date can be a good thing, but also can have unforeseen impacts on other areas or leave the project operating inefficiently. On the other hand such a positive risk can actually help to balance out the impact of negative risks in other areas.

Tip #3 – Prioritise for efficiency
All risks are not equal and there is always limitations around how much resource can be applied to mitigate them. As such it is essential to classify risks in terms of ‘probability’ or how likely the risk is to occur and ‘impact’ level if the risk materialises into an issue. By doing so will allow the project manager and all team members to easily see which risks are priority to focus on. Use of a risk register template is a very effective means of doing so. Most organisations would have a standard template for this or if not there are many that can be found online.

Tip #4 – Apply correct ownership
It is often common for people within the project organisation to assume that the project manager owns all risks but this is completely false. Risks can affect wide areas of the wider stakeholder group and it is typical that resources with the relevant knowledge or skills in that area are much better placed to become the owner of the risk and to carry out the appropriate mitigation actions.

Tip #5 – Communicate and track to closure
With correct identification, classification and owner allocation in place we need to be careful as project managers that this is not considered to be the final step in the process of risk management. At this stage it is critical that the risks are correctly communicated. Firstly to the owner assigned to manage the mitigation actions and secondly to the wider stakeholder group affected so they are aware of the risk and potential impact to their respective areas. It is also then essential that the risks are regularly monitored and tracked through to closure regarding progress on mitigation actions and potentially changes to the impact / probability classifications as those actions come to fruition.

Summary
By following the above tips, project managers will be well placed to be in a position of control in relation to the management of risks for their projects and ultimately this will ensure a sound foundation for the successful delivery of their work

How to Protect Your Restaurant Against Power Surges

Power surges due to local area load shedding or lightning strikes are a reality for most people. The rush of a power surge that takes place when the electricity rushes through the electrical circuit can cause devastating results for businesses and restaurants.

Restaurants rely on electricity constantly as it affects the amount of customers they get. If a restaurant is shut down due to a power surge that electrocuted all the kitchen equipment, it means that income is lost for that period. As a restaurant owner, you need to plan what you would do in such an event and how to prevent it.

The first thing you could do is to install a power surge protector. This power surge protector can minimise the impact of a power surge when lightning strikes. So the electrical catering equipment will not get that quick rush of electricity which can lead to electrical failure. The consequences of a sudden electrical rush can be devastating as the electricity can burn or destroy an electrical appliance’s circuit board.

You could consider using gas powered catering equipment such as a gas stove and oven. For restaurants there are 6 burner stove options available that allow you to cook more food at one time. A gas stove and oven is not connected to an electrical outlet but rather to a gas cylinder. Therefore during a power surge, this commercial catering equipment will be safe.

It is advisable to unplug your catering equipment while it’s not in use during a storm. In this manner you can minimise the devastating effects of a storm. You can still continue with the restaurant duties by using the minimal catering equipment required. Anything that your staff is not using, unplug it while the storm ensues.

Check that your insurance covers the replacement of your kitchen equipment when it is struck by lightning. Most insurance companies do cover this but with others it is an optional cover. In the event that your catering equipment is damaged due to lightning, they should be able to replace it. However, take the precautions anyway, because the time between the insurance pays out and the electrical surge could be days or weeks apart and your restaurant still has to keep on going.

The last thing you want is for all your electrical catering equipment to be damaged due to lightning. Rather take the precautions before it happens and save yourself the burden and cost of having to replace the catering equipment.

What Is Fleet Risk Management and Do You Need It?

Running a business is nothing if not expensive. From the costs associated with your supply chain to little recurring costs like supplies, heating and electricity, it seems like much of your work is keeping the books balanced.

As such, we’re all guilty of finding ways to cut back on expenditure to help our revenue growth, but whilst many of those cutbacks fall firmly on the side of smart, is it a good idea to cut back on fleet risk management if you’re operating a fleet of vehicles?

The answer is no, but what is fleet risk management, and why do you actually need it? Read on to find out.

What is Fleet Risk Management?

Put at its most basic, fleet risk management is the process of ensuring that you are doing as much as possible to make sure that everyone with a company car within your business is insured, safe and aware of any dangers out on the road.

It helps to keep drivers safe whilst out on the road, reduces your fleet costs and ensures that you’re compliant with the law. But why is it against the law to not engage with fleet risk management? It has a little something to do with…

Your Duty of Care

If you’re a business owner, you’ll likely be aware that you have a duty of care to your staff to ensure that your workplace is safe. In doing so, you must work to prevent health risks from occurring and train staff to deal with any danger which is likely to occur.

What you might not know though is that your duty of care doesn’t end at your welcome mat – it extends out to anywhere your staff will be working, and that includes any fleet vehicles you operate. In effect, this means that you are legally obligated to ensure that your staff are properly trained and aware of potential risks. Failure to do so can result in you being liable for any accidents that occur – something nobody wants.

There are three main areas of risk management that you need to attend to. They are:

Driver

· Driver vetting and selection

· Induction procedures

· Licence checks

· Accident reporting procedures

Vehicle

· Vehicle suitability

· Vehicle maintenance and inspections

· Vehicle security

Journey

· Journey planning

· Managing driver fatigue

· Speed management

· Journey type

It’s always recommended that you work with an outside fleet risk management company, as this will ensure that you are 100% compliant with the law and that your staff are getting the required support in order to do their jobs effectively.